God is a lazy bitch

20 Jun

How come god always need some idiot down  here on earth to do his dirty work? If you’re all powerful, get off your ass and come do it yourself. Why is it god always needs men to carry out his bidding. A woman needs to be stoned for being raped? Why can’t god just zap her dead? Nope, men have to get the stones and kill her. A cartoonist needs to die because he made fun of the prophet? God can’t do it, he’s busy with other stuff, so send a mob of angry men after them. If I was one of god’s follower’s I’d be pretty pissed. How come I have to do all the work all the time? Why can’t you carry out your own damn will? Oh, you created the universe? Whoopy doo. If you’re all powerful I bet you didn’t even break a sweat. The difficulty to ability ratio is way off for god. If he can do anything, his ability will infinity outweigh the difficulty. But to protest science being taught in schools or to blow up an abortion clinic, well that takes effort on behalf of believers. It’s completely unfair. Get off your lazy ass and start smiting people!

2 Responses to “God is a lazy bitch”

  1. Charlie June 27, 2010 at 8:48 pm #

    Dustin,

    You know me well enough to know I do not support stoning rape victims, assaulting critics of religion, protesting science in school, blowing up abortion clinics, and so forth. But you also know me to be a Christian who has been studying to try to understand the history and direction of my faith for some time.
    One perspective I can share with you which in a way responds to your question is the idea that while God is active in this world, God works in, through and with people a lot to accomplish his will. That isn’t saying God is doing whatever we think needs doing and in our time schedule. It is also not saying God can’t work –unless- he is working through people. No evil done will go un-responded to for ever, all will be answered. The thing is, often times we humans are given the assignment and responsibility to be first respondents in the effort to do God’s will. That is because we are assigned the responsibility of being good stewards of this world. But if we fail, and we do, it will still be responded to, and justice applied.
    This, of course, is a difficult position to grasp if one insists that God must do whatever is needed –now-, or within our own perceived framework of effective time. It is easy to see and think that no justice is done and conclude there is no God when that God doesn’t submit to ‘our wisdom’. Thinking in terms of life lived beyond the 70 or so years of ‘normal’ human life can help to see a different timeline which lacks none of the justice and compassion attributed to that God.

    Best regards and just a brief thought,

    -Charlie

  2. godlesspaladin June 28, 2010 at 1:02 pm #

    Argh, I’m embarrassed. I often get angry, forget that you, and other reasonable people, read this and thus become bombastic. Sorry about that. :-\

    “One perspective I can share with you which in a way responds to your question is the idea that while God is active in this world, God works in, through and with people a lot to accomplish his will. That isn’t saying God is doing whatever we think needs doing and in our time schedule. It is also not saying God can’t work –unless- he is working through people.”

    Ok, please correct me if I’m wrong (which is likely if I misunderstood you), but are you saying that God, while still taking part in the world, no longer makes meta changes like parting seas, catching crashing airplanes, or deflecting hurricanes, but instead works more subtly by influencing mortals to carry out his will? (Though not to say he wouldn’t do those meta things if he wanted to) And that God is working on a different time table with different goals than what we can understand?

    If I underst00d correctly, I’d like to make a few observations. Why is it that we find all these great meta things God can do only in the bible, mostly the old testament, but we never see these things happen in modern times. It’s as if as soon as we could more easily record information and transmit it, these meta miracles stopped. Now-a-days most “miracles” are small things like somebody is “miraculously” cured of cancer. Doctors might not be able to explain it, but that doesn’t necessarily mean we can explain it with “it’s a miracle”, it just means that we can’t explain it. (There’s actual an entire site devoted to this stuff, whywontgodhealamputees.com )

    “No evil done will go un-responded to for ever, all will be answered. The thing is, often times we humans are given the assignment and responsibility to be first respondents in the effort to do God’s will. That is because we are assigned the responsibility of being good stewards of this world. But if we fail, and we do, it will still be responded to, and justice applied.”

    Why is it the case then that whenever God decides to work through someone, he always has to do it secretly and privately to one person. Moses disappears up a mountain alone and comes back with a message from god, Jesus, Muhammad, Joseph Smith, the pope, and thousands of others all claim that god spoke privately to them and told them to tell others. We have only this person’s word on, but personal experiences are just about useless when trying to logically convince people something is true because that other person has no ability to reference or test the claims. It would make a lot more sense if he just came out and said X, without using the fallible medium of humanity. To me it seems a lot more likely that these people are suffering from a Neapolitan delusion or other delusion of over inflated self importance: “God has chosen ME to spread his word!”

    (And on a side note, there is a strain within some evangelical circles that choose to skip over the “steward” part and focus on the “dominion” part. They argue that it is blasphemous to think we humans can in any way harm God’s perfect creation, and that we have a biblical command to subdue the earth to our will. Luckily I know you, and I’d assume most others, are not like this, but they exist)

    ”This, of course, is a difficult position to grasp if one insists that God must do whatever is needed –now-, or within our own perceived framework of effective time. It is easy to see and think that no justice is done and conclude there is no God when that God doesn’t submit to ‘our wisdom’. Thinking in terms of life lived beyond the 70 or so years of ‘normal’ human life can help to see a different timeline which lacks none of the justice and compassion attributed to that God.”

    It is indeed difficult to grasp. You touched on this earlier, but I took it as “God has different priorities than humans & works on a time table longer than a lifetime.” What stumps me is that “good” human priorities seem to be helping other people, preserving and encouraging life, and overall trying to make existence better. Now I would argue that we know our priorities are “good” because they are the most conducive to achieving the goal of a healthy and happy populace. Through hundreds of thousands of years of trial and error we’ve hammered out what works and what doesn’t. There are some commands in the bible that work, “love thy neighbor”, and others that don’t “stone to death anyone for A-Z”

    So if we can know something is good independent of God using logic and reason (that some people would argue he gave to us), and yet God seems to do/allow things that are grossly not good, then that really throws a kink in the whole “omni-benevolent” idea. And as for timeframes larger than a lifetime, you know history as well as I do, but I see it as a laundry list of horrible injustices, all the way back. Now this doesn’t show that there is no god but, to me, it shows that he is at least not omni-benevolent. Perhaps his priority is not the happy and healthy lives of his creation. Perhaps he is working on a timeframe bigger than recorded time itself; regardless, given the present data I cannot help but conclude that if he does exist, then our wellbeing as a species is not one of his priorities.

    Now, this laundry list to me, and you I believe, is not so much something to just despair about, but a call to action to try and see that there is justice while we have a chance to work towards it, whether god is working through us or not.
    Best wishes, and again, sorry about the bombastic nature of the post, I didn’t have you in mind when writing it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: